Peony List

According to some estimates, there are over 3,000 cultivated varieties of peony. I'm not going to list all of them (although a fairly comprehensive list is available at Carsten Burkhardt's Web Project Paeonia). Instead, my listing (of just over 100 varieties) attempts to include the majority of popular peony varieties, as well as a few rarer ones that I personally like.

Each entry has a photo, the name of the cultivar, and a list of pertinent information, as follows:

The entry concludes with some more detailed information about the variety (for example, the derivation of the name, awards won, and uses). The entries are in alphabetical order, arranged by the name of the variety. Finally, for explanations of the botanical terms used, please see the Glossary provided.

Photo of peony Angel Cheeks Angel Cheeks
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Carl G. Klehm, before 1975; double bomb form, pink, midseason, approx. 26 - 34" (65 - 85 cm) tall, mild fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 2005; large, full blooms have a ball of mixed dark pink and cream petals, with a double row of shell pink guard petals; excellent green foliage; sturdy stems; excellent cut flower and garden plant
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Ann Cousins Ann Cousins
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Cousins, 1946; double, white, late to very late, approx. 32 - 34" (80 - 85 cm) tall, fragrant
An American Peony Society National Exhibition Grand Champion in 1954; has enormous, full-petalled, ivory white blossoms — up to 8" (20 cm) in diameter; delightful lemony fragrance; fairly coarse dark green foliage; vigorous, productive, and dependable bloomer; best when staked; excellent exhibition flower and cut flower; popular and usually easy to find
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Athena Athena
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Saunders, 1955; single, cream & lilac, very early, approx. 30 - 34" (75 - 85 cm) tall; light fragrance
Beautiful, and striking flowers: cream, buff or apricot blossoms, with raspberry flares at the base of each petal, surrounding a centre of yellow stamens; strong stems — no staking needed; doesn't do well under water stress; good for the garden, exhibition, and as a cut flower; rather rare and difficult to find
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Attar of Roses Attar of Roses
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Murawska, 1951; double, pink, early midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, outstanding fragrance
The name refers to a strongly perfumed oil used in cosmetics which is derived from roses; as the name implies, this peony has a wonderful intense rose fragrance; large, vivid rose pink blossoms, which may have a few golden stamens sprinkled throughout; flowering side buds extend the bloom period; good, dark green foliage; tall peony — best when staked; fairly rare and difficult to find
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Auguste Dessert Auguste Dessert
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert, 1920; semi-double to double, pink, late midseason, approx. 32" (80 cm) tall, fragrant
Also spelled "August Dessert"; lots of brilliant rose pink blossoms in a wheel-like form; petals edged with a narrow silver border; some golden stamens often visible; free-flowering plant, with strong stems; foliage has nice autumn coloring; good garden plant
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Baroness Schroeder Baroness Schroeder
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Kelway, 1889; double, blush white, late midseason, approx. 35" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Large, rose form, pale blush pink flowers, which quickly fade to pure white; mild rose fragrance; vigorous, free-flowering plant; excellent deep green foliage; good stems, but staking may be needed; good garden plant and cut flower; said to open even better in a vase with water than when left on the bush
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Bartzella Bartzella
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Roger F. Anderson, 1986; semi-double to double, yellow, midseason, approx. 30 - 48" (75 - 120 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Awarded the 2006 Gold Medal for excellence by the American Peony Society; one of the most popular intersectional hybrids available; has fluffy, lemon yellow flowers; centre petals show red flares at their base; blooms are very large — up to 10" (25 cm) in diameter; blossoming side buds extend flowering season to three, or even four, weeks; lovely lemon fragrance; prolific, strong, symmetrical plant — no staking needed; lovely, deeply cut, dark green foliage; excellent garden plant and cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Big Ben Big Ben
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1943; double bomb form, red, early midseason, approx. 36 - 48" (90 - 120 cm) tall, floriferous, very fragrant
Flowers are deep, old rose red colour; delicious, sweet fragrance; so tall that it stands over most other peonies; however, stiff, reddish stems hold flowers erect, so that no staking is needed; fine foliage; very good in warmer climates; good cut flower; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Blaze Blaze
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Orville W. Fay, 1973; single, red, early midseason, approx. 28 - 34" (70 - 85 cm) tall
Two or three rows of large, slightly waved, fiery scarlet petals surround a centre of yellow stamens; strong, vigorous plant; dark green foliage; no staking needed; good for perennial borders and in flower arrangements
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Bowl of Beauty Bowl of Beauty
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Hoogendoorn, 1949; Japanese form, pink, approx. 25 - 43" ( 60 - 110 cm) tall, fragrant
One of the most popular and famous herbaceous peonies availabe, because of its striking beauty: fuchsia rose guard petals surround a mound of pale lemon yellow staminodes; huge blossoms can reach up to 12" (30 cm) in diameter; good, green foliage; sturdy stems — rarely needs staking; usually quite inexpensive; note: nobody agrees on the flowering date of this peony — I have seen it described as early, early midseason, midseason, late midseason, and late!
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Bowl of Cream Bowl of Cream
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Klehm, 1963; double, white, late midseason, approx. 30 - 34" (75 - 85 cm) tall, occasionally floriferous, good fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1981; National Exhibition Grand Champion in 1994; enormous, rose form, creamy white flowers — up to 12" (30 cm) in diameter — with hidden golden stamens, giving flower a golden glow; good garden plant; wonderful cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Bride's Dream Bride's Dream
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Krekler, 1965; Japanese anemone form, white, late midseason, approx. 28 - 36" (70 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, excellent fragrance
Two rows of large, pure white petals surround a centre of narrow, pointed petaloids, which are either very pale yellow or creamy white; numerous side buds prolong the flowering period; flowers held well above the foliage by sturdy, wiry stems — staking not needed
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Buckeye Belle Buckeye Belle
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Mains, 1956; semi-double, red, early, approx. 24 - 34" (60 - 85 cm) tall, no fragrance
This peony is such a dark red that phrases like "chocolate red", "blackish red", "deep mahogany", and "maroon" are used to try to describe it; broad, well-rounded, velvety dark red petals contrast with the central sprinkling of golden stamens; foliage turns dark red in autumn; strong stems — staking not needed; recommended particularly for more southerly climates
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Bu-te Bu-te
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Wassenberg, 1954; Japanese, white, midseason, approx. 40" (100 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1975; large, bowl-shaped, pure white blossoms, with a large centre of yellow staminodes; outer petals are slightly ruffled; dark green foliage; red-mottled stems are tall and strong — staking usually not required, if plant is protected from wind
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony  Butter Bowl Butter Bowl
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Rosenfield, 1955; Japanese form, pink, midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Also known as "Butterbowl"; obviously named for the huge, buttery yellow centre set inside a wide fan of rose-pink petals, which fade gradually to shell pink; vigorous, reliable, and free flowering plant; good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Candy Stripe Candy Stripe
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Roger Anderson, 1981; double, white & red, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Really stunning blossoms: white with raspberry red streaks: looks like peppermint candy; light fragrance; vigorous, and very reliable bloomer; excellent foliage all summer long; long, strong stems; good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Charlie's White Charlie's White
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Klehm, 1951; double bomb form, white, early midseason, approx. 36 - 48" (90 - 120 cm) tall, fragrant
Also spelled "Charlie White", "Charley's White", and "Charle's White"; huge, classic, elegantly formed, pure white flowers illuminated by a golden glow at the base of the petals; good fragrance; tall, vigorous plant; durable foliage; tall, strong stems; good for the back of the perennial border; one of the very best peonies for cut flowers; also good for drying
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Chestine Gowdy Chestine Gowdy
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Brand, 1913; double, pink, late, approx. 26" (65 cm) tall, floriferous, very fragrant
Named for the teacher of a one room schoolhouse; blossoms have a bright rose pink centre and outer petals, with a cream collar around the middle; some pink petals have hairline edging of red; delicious fragrance; dark strong stems; excellent garden plant and good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Claire de Lune Claire de Lune
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by White/Wild & Son, 1954; single, yellow, very early, approx. 28 - 32" (70 - 80 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Also known as "Clair de Lune"; blossom of 10 round petals, crinkled at the edges, in a pale, lemon yellow colour, with a central tuft of delicate, yellow orange stamens; lovely sweet scent; free blooming, robust plant; large, deep green leaves; sturdy, slender stems — no staking needed; good cut flower; slow growing, but worth the wait
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Cora Louise Cora Louise
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Roger Anderson, 1986; semi-double, white & purple, midseason, 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, slightly fragrant
Numerous, large white blossoms with crimson purple flares at the base of each petal; colour contrast makes a very striking effect; very reliable plant; deeply-cut, dark green foliage; strong stems, which hold flowers well above the foliage
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Coral Charm Coral Charm
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Samuel Wissing, 1964; semi-double, coral, early midseason, approx. 36 - 48" ( 90 - 120 cm) tall, no fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1986; Grand Champion peony in 2003; numerous, large flowers of antique rose form are a rich apricot coral, which fades to a soft peach shade; very tall, vigorous plant; good garden plant and great cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Coral 'n Gold Coral 'n Gold
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Lyman Cousins & Roy Klehm, 1981; single, coral, early midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall
Also known as "Coral and Gold"; a double row of large, cup-shaped, rose-coral petals form a bowl around a centre of feathery golden yellow stamens; looks something like a poppy; bred by Mr. Lyman Cousins of Ontario and subsequently registered with the American Peony Society by Roy Klehm; vigorous plant; staking not needed; outstanding in flower arrangments
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Dandy Dan Dandy Dan
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by E. Auten Jr., 1946; semi-double to double, red, early, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall; faint fragrance or none
Blossoms are a fine, deep claret red; may be semi-double and double on same bush; light green foliage; very sturdy plant with stiff stems — no staking needed; good garden plant, but fairly rare and hard to find
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony David Harum David Harum
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Brand, 1920; double, red, midseason, approx. 34" tall, floriferous, no fragrance
Large, beautifully-formed flower of rosy crimson; when first open, is globular "bomb" shape, but develops into an irregular rose form bloom; strong stems; broad, light green foliage; excellent cut flower or garden plant
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Dinner Plate Dinner Plate
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Klehm, 1968; double, pink, late midseason, approx. 33 - 43" (85 - 110 cm) tall, faint fragrance
Aptly named because the flowers are enormous — up to 7" (18 cm) in diameter; beautiful, rose-form lilac pink blossoms; soft, mild fragrance; tall plant, strong grower; lush, dark green foliage; long, strong stems; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Do Tell Do Tell
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1946; Japanese anemone form, pink, midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 2004; delicate but showy, large blossoms have outer petals of a soft shell pink, which contrasts with the fluffy centre of rose red, pink, and white; extended blooming season; vigorous and prolific plant; dark green foliage; strong, red stems — no staking needed; excellent garden plant
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Doreen Doreen
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by H. E. Sass, 1949; Japanese form, pink, late midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
Flower has magenta-rose guard petals which contrast effectively with the massive centre of frilly, golden petaloids; very vigorous plant
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Dr. Alexander Fleming Dr. Alexander Fleming
P. lactiflora cultivar; origin unclear; double, pink, midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, very floriferous, fragrant
Also known as "Alexander Fleming", "Dr. Alex Fleming", "Docteur Alexander Fleming", and "Dr. Alexander Flemming"; named for Sir Alexander Fleming (1881 - 1955), the British scientist who discovered penicillin; the originator of this peony is unclear: some sources say it was developed in England, others in France, and still others in The Netherlands (by Blonk before 1950); in any case, it's a very popular peony in Europe and North America, known particularly for its sweet fragrance; has large, bright pink flowers, which fade to a paler pink towards the edges; the large number of side buds extend the blooming season; outstanding cut flower
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Duchesse de Nemours Duchesse de Nemours
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Calot, 1856; double, white, early midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, very fragrant
Also known as "Duchess de Nemours"; another peony which has been deservedly popular for over 150 years; produces lots of medium-sized, creamy white flowers with light canary yellow in the centre, and shadings of green at the base of the petals; fades to pure white; glorious sweet fragrance; dependable bloomer; excellent light green foliage; very good cut flower; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Early Scout Early Scout
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Auten, 1952; single, red, very early, approx. 18 - 24" (45 - 60 cm) tall, faint fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 2001; cup-shaped, deep crimson petals surround a central cluster of bright yellow stamens; a "petite" plant with appropriately small blossoms — about 3" (8 cm) in diameter; beautiful, dense, deep green cut-leaf foliage, which is quite heat resistant; nicely rounded bush with strong stems — staking not needed; nice cut flower; excellent for rock garden or front of perennial border
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Edulis Superba Edulis Superba
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemon, 1824; double, pink, early, approx. 20 - 36" (50 - 90 cm) tall, very floriferous, very fragrant
This peony was introduced in 1824; the fact that it's still very popular tells you that it has a lot going for it; the flower has a variety of shades of deep and light pinks; the notched petals have silver edges; one of the most fragrant peonies available — has the scent of old fashioned roses; extremely floriferous; very reliable plant, with excellent foliage; good garden or cut flower; should be staked; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Elsa Sass Elsa Sass
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Hans P. Sass, 1930; double, white, late, approx. 26 - 36" (65 - 90 cm) tall, fragrant
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal winner in 1943; exceptionally beautiful, large, velvety, rose-form blossoms of pure white; mild, pleasing fragrance; compact plant with strong, rigid stems; good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Etched Salmon Etched Salmon
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Lyman Cousins & Roy Klehm, 1981; double, pink, early midseason, approx. 34 - 39" (85 - 100 cm) tall, fragrant
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 2002; exquisite, large, dark salmon pink flower with golden-edged internal petaloids; fades to pale apricot; the petals are arranged in total symmetry, folded neatly to form a lovely, flat, yet ruffled bloom; very robust stems — no staking needed
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Fairy's Petticoat Fairy's Petticoat
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Carl G. Klehm, 1963; double bomb form, pink, early midseason, approx. 30 - 32" (75 - 80 cm) tall, very floriferous, excellent fragrance
Very large, fluffy flower: ruffled petals of blush pink and pale yellow; fades to a creamy white; dark green foliage; sturdy bush with fine plant form; best when staked; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Omeo Peonies
Photo of peony Fancy Nancy Fancy Nancy
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1944; Japanese anemone form, pink, midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
Refined flowers with cerise pink petals and lacy centre tuft of pink and cream; very prolific; may require staking, depending on location
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Felix Crousse Félix Crousse
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Crousse, 1881; double bomb form, red, late midseason, approx. 30 - 32" (75 - 80 cm) tall, very floriferous, faint fragrance
Winner of the Royal Horticultural Society Award of Garden Merit; has numerous, large, lustrous, raspberry red flowers, having a wide collar of guard petals and a tightly-packed "bomb" form centre; dependable variety, which is quite drought-resistant; good cut flower; usually requires staking
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Festiva Maxima Festiva Maxima
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Mielles, 1851; double, white, early midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, very fragrant
This heirloom peony variety has been deservedly popular for over 150 years; large, globular flowers have wide, loosely-arranged rose-form blossoms of pure white with a few crimson flecks on top; delightful fragrance; dependable, vigorous grower; large, attractive, dark green foliage; strong stems, but staking is recommended; beautiful cut flower; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Firelight Firelight
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by A. P. Saunders, 1950; single, pink, early, approx. 26 - 36" (65 - 90 cm) tall, faint fragrance
Bright rose-pink flower with darker pink flares at base of petals; a centre of red-tipped stigmas is surrounded by golden stamens; petals fade to pale pink
(Photo courtesy of Peony Garden)
Photo of peony First Arrival First Arrival
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Roger F. Anderson, 1986; semi-double, pink, midseason, approx. 26 - 30" (65 - 75 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Lots of lavender pink blossoms; over time most of petal fades to pale pink, but base remains deeper lavender shade; large flowers may be 6 - 8" (15 - 20 cm) in diameter; stand up well to bad weather; flowers before most other intersectional hybrids; dark green, deeply cut foliage; strong stems — staking not needed
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Flame Flame
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Glasscock, 1939; single, red, early, approx. 26 - 32" (65 - 80 cm) tall, no fragrance
Cupped, scarlet blossoms with very wide petals, and a centre of golden stamens; in sandy soil, the colour may be closer to a deep coral pink; vigorous, bush which grows quickly to a large clump with numerous flowers; abundant, glossy green foliage; strong stems — doesn't need staking; great garden plant and good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Garden Treasure Garden Treasure
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Hollingsworth, 1984; semi-double, yellow, mid to late season, approx. 24 - 30" (60 - 75 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1996; very large blossoms (20 - 50 petals!) of true golden yellow; petals have scarlet flares at the base; centre is green and cream, with pink stigmas; many side buds provide a long blooming period; lovely lemon scent; very hardy and vigorous widely-spreading bush; dark green, semi-glossy foliage; strong stems — staking not needed
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Gardenia Gardenia
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lins, 1948; double, blush white, midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, very floriferous, light fragrance
Not surprisingly, shaped much like a gardenia; pale pink buds open to reveal a beautifully-shaped blossom of pure, creamy white (but in some years pale blush pink), with golden stamens mixed with the centre petals; light, sweet fragrance; dark green, somewhat coarse foliage; strong, thick red-tinted stems; good cut flower, garden flower, and show flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Gay Paree Gay Paree
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1933; Japanese anemone form, pink & white, midseason, approx. 30 - 42" (75 - 105 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Exceptionally showy; cerise pink outer guard petals, with a centre of light shell-pink and creamy white petaloids; numerous blooms per plant, but none very large — to dramatically increase size of blossoms, pinch off side buds while they are still only pea-sized; vigorous, nicely-shaped bush; light green foliage; strong stems — no staking needed; great cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Gilbert H. Wild Gilbert H. Wild
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Nicholls/Gilbert H. Wild & Son, 1957; double, pink/white, late midseason, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Also known as "Gilbert Wild"; huge, rose-form flowers of pale rose-pink with paler pink edges; over time these fade to an almost pure white; combination of flowers opening at different rates on one bush gives a lovely pink and white effect; good, dark green foliage; stiff, red-mottled stems; staking may or may not be needed — depends on location in garden; relatively rare and difficult to find
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Gold Standard Gold Standard
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Rosenfield, 1934; Japanese form, white & yellow, late midseason, approx. 36 - 38" (90 - 95 cm) tall, sometimes floriferous, excellent fragrance
Two rows of cup-shaped creamy white petals surround a centre of golden yellow staminodes; exquisite fragrance; lush green foliage; tall straight stems — no staking needed; excellent garden plant or in a floral arrangement
(Photo courtesy of Homestead Farms Nursery)
Photo of peony Henry Bockstoce Henry Bockstoce
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Bockstoce, 1955; double, red, early midseason, approx. 32 - 40" (80 - 105 cm) tall, very fragrant
Enormous, dark burgundy red blossoms with a rose centre; tall plant with huge flowers on long stems — makes an impressive display; one of the best red doubles available; beautiful fragrance; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Hermione Hermione
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Hans P. Sass, 1932; double, pink, late midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, very fragrant
Often misspelled "Hermoine"; huge, frilly, rich apple-blossom pink flowers; heavenly fragrance; dark green foliage; red-mottled stems; may need staking; good garden and cut flower; an excellent older variety that is usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Hillary Hillary
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Roger F. Anderson, 1999; semi-double to double, red/yellow, midseason, approx. 24 - 32" (60 - 80 cm) tall, fragrant
Blend of rose-red and apricot yellow; yellow gradually fades to cream on up upper part of petals; lower part stays red; bush with a combination of many blooms in different stages gives a spectacular effect; long blooming season; vigorous bush; graceful, tropical-looking, dark green foliage; great garden plant
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Honey Gold Honey Gold
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by C.G. Klehm, before 1976; Japanese form, white, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Large, creamy white guard petals surround a large center of golden petaloids; distinguished by a delicious, sweet fragrance; silky, light green foliage and sturdy stems; a distinctive garden flower, and a good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Illini Warrior Illini Warrior
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Glasscock & Falk, 1955; single, red, early, approx. 32 - 39" (80 - 100 cm) tall, very floriferous, faint fragrance
Brilliant, cup shaped blooms of deep cardinal red, with a centre of golden stamens; large, vigorous plant — allow for extra growing space; dark green foliage; strong supporting stems
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Jan van Leeuwen Jan van Leeuwen
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by van Leeuwen, 1928; Japanese form, white, late midseason, approx 36" (90 cm) tall, faint fragrance
Large, heavy white outer petals cupped around a small centre of narrow golden petaloids and green carpels; medium green foliage, with a ribbed effect on the leaves; erect, strong stems; good garden or cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Julia Rose Julia Rose
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Anderson; single to semi-double, red/orange/pink, midseason, approx. 28 - 36" (70 - 90 cm) tall, slightly floriferous, faint fragrance
Flower opens cherry red colour, which fades gradually toward an orange salmon, and finally become of a mixture of cream and pale rose; all three colours may be seen at the same time; has a small heart of gold and red stamens; dark green foliage; flowers are carried well above the foliage on long, firm stems — no staking needed; good garden and cut flower; can be expensive, but the colours are spectacular
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Kansas Kansas
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Bigger, 1940; double, red, early midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, slightly floriferous, no fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1957; has very large, rose-form blooms, of a rich, glowing watermelon red; colour is quite fade resistant; plant is vigorous and dependable grower; dark green foliage and exceptionally strong stems; excellent garden or cut flower, or for drying; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Omeo Peonies)
Photo of peony Karl Rosenfield Karl Rosenfield
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Rosenfield, 1908; double, red, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, fragrant
Considered by many to be the best red double; produces lots of flowers of a loose semi-rose form; large, intense cherry red blooms, with notched petal tips; some golden stamens showing through; lush foliage; may need staking; good garden and cut flower variety; dries well; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Krinkled White Krinkled White
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by A. M. Brand, 1928; single, white, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, very floriferous, faint fragrance
This is probably the finest of all the white singles; flowers are large and numerous; open a delicate pink, but soon become a pure, translucent white; petals are large and crinkled like crepe paper; small tuft of golden stamens in the centre; stands up well in the rain; light green foliage; strong, slender stems — seldom needs staking; excellent cut flower; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony La France La France
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemoine, 1901; double, pink, late, approx. 32" (80 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Huge, perfectly-form rose-pink flowers with dark pink outer petals; true rose-form double, with very broad & deep petals; strong stems & good foliage; a remarkable show flower and equally good for the garden
(Photo courtesy of Parkland Perennials)
Photo of peony Lady Alexandra Duff Lady Alexandra Duff
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Kelway, 1902; double and semi-double, pink, midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall; very floriferous, fragrant
This peony is also known as "Lady Alexander Duff" and "Lady A. Duff"; it was named for Lady Alexandra Duff (1891-1959), who was the daughter of Princess Louise of Wales and the Duke of Fife, whose family name was Duff. She was named for her grandmother Queen Alexandra, wife of King Edward VII; she was only 11 when Kelway named this peony for her. It has very large, fluffy mauve pink double flowers which lighten to blush or cream in the centre; the numerous saucer-shaped side blossoms are generally semi-double; alluring fragrance; vigorous, with abundant foliage and strong stems; an heirloom variety which is generally quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Laura Dessert Laura Dessert
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert; 1913; double or Japanese anemone form, white, early midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Flower form is between an anemone and double type; buds are pale pink; when open, guard petals are white, surrounding a cream to pale lemon yellow tuft of narrow petaloids, aging to creamy white; lovely rose fragrance; good stems and healthy dark green foliage; no staking needed
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Lavender Lavender
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Saunders, 1939; single, pink, early, approx. 30 " (75 cm) tall
Clear lavender petals with a centre of golden stamens and burgundy carpels; grey-green leaflets; strong purple stems — no staking needed; rather rare and difficult to find
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Le Charme Le Charme
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Martin Eliason, 1964; Japanese form, deep pink, late midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, excellent fragrance
Cup-shaped, rich, rose-coloured petals surround a centre of butter-yellow staminodes, which are streaked pink; floriferous with three to four side-buds, and, thus, long flowering; vigorous, and stands well — staking not needed; little affected by rain
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Le Cygne Le Cygne
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemoine, 1907; double, white, early midseason, approx. 28 - 34" (70 - 85 cm) tall, fragrant
"Le cygne" is French for "the swan"; the broad, overlapping, curved petals are reminiscent of the feathers on the wings of a swan; very large, rose-form ivory blooms which fade to pure white; large-leafed foliage and strong stems; elegant form — one of the most perfect double white peonies; stunning cut flower
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Madame Jules Dessert Madame Jules Dessert
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert 1909; double to semi-double, blush pink, late midseason, approx. 36 - 43" (90 - 110 cm) tall, very floriferous, fragrant
Also known as "Mme. Jules Dessert"; rose-form, blush-coloured blossoms showing golden stamens; centre is usually a trifle pinker than the rest of the flower, and always bears a few inconspicuous crimson marks; fades to creamy white; so floriferous that there seem to be more flowers than leaves visible; beautiful foliage; may need staking
(Photo courtesy of PlantenTuin Esveld)
Photo of peony Maestro Maestro
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1957; double, red, midseason, approx. 32 - 34" (80 - 85 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
This peony is actually somewhere between a loose double and a semi-double; stunning, velvety, deep red flowers with prominent golden stamens intermingled in the petals; red, wiry stem; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Omeo Peonies)
Photo of peony Mahogany Mahogany
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Glasscock, 1937; Japanese form, red, early, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, faint fragrance
Large, cup-shaped blossoms of intense dark red, which resist fading; looks like a single, but is actually a Japanese form with very small thick yellow staminodes; light green foliage; good garden or cut flower; no staking needed
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Many Happy Returns Many Happy Returns
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Hollingsworth, 1986; Japanese anemone form to bomb double, red, early midseason, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, no fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 2007. The medium-sized blossoms are an intense, rosy scarlet; the plant is vigorous and prolific; produces abundant flowers, on erect stems; foliage is slightly ruffled; cut buds do very well in cool storage, even after several weeks; blossoms last for a long time in a vase; excellent for floral arrangements
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Martha Bulloch Martha Bulloch
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Brand, 1907; double, pink, late midseason, approx. 32 - 38" (80 - 95 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Has enormous flowers which can be up to 12" (30 cm) in diameter; blossoms are a bright cerise rose pink with shading to silvery shell pink at the petal edges; light green, narrow foliage; plant is very tall and sturdy; superb cut flower, and also a good garden flower
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony Mikado Mikado
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced from Japan, 1893; Japanese form, red, late midseason, approx. 40 - 43" (100 - 110 cm) tall, very floriferous, unpleasant fragrance
Variety was introduced to the U.S.A. by the Japanese exhibit at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. Extremely impressive, tall plant; wavy ruffled petals of dark rosy crimson; a centre of thick staminodes, which are dark rose red, edged and tipped in gold; considered one of the very best red peonies of its type; abundant lush green foliage, erect stems; very decorative garden plant
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Miss America Miss America
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Mann & van Steen, 1926; semi-double, white, early midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
This peony has twice won the American Peony Society's Gold Medal: 1956 & 1971. Blush pink buds open to large, cupped, pure white flowers with a centre of golden stamens; this is the standard for semi-double whites; lots of side buds help extend the bloom period; good garden or cut flower; especially good for more southerly areas
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Mister Ed Mister Ed
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Klehm, 1980; double bomb form, white or pink, midseason, 28 - 36" (70 - 90 cm) tall, fragrant
Also known as "Mr. Ed"; very unusual peony which can bloom either rose pink, cream blush, or a combination of the two colours; blossoms are large and have a light, sweet fragrance; vigorous grower with tall strong stems; good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Monsieur Jules Elie Monsieur Jules Elie
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Crousse, 1888; double bomb form, pink, early midseason, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tall, fragrant
Also known as: "'Mons. Jules Elie" or "Msr. Jules Elie"; huge, chrysanthemum-like, silvery rose-pink blooms; this heirloom classic has been popular for over one hundred years, but is quite inexpensive; one of the very best cut flowers; may need staking
(Photo courtesy of Blossom Hill Nursery)
Photo of peony Mother's Choice Mother's Choice
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Glassock, 1950; double, blush white, late midseason, approx. 30 - 34" (75 - 85 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1993. Very large, perfectly-formed flowers composed of creamy white petals with a faint blush; occasionally show a hint of magenta red on the edges of the petals; very dependable bloomer; wide-leafed bush; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Mrs. Edward Harding Mrs Edward Harding
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Shaylor, 1918; double, white, midseason, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, fragrant
Also known as "Mrs. Ed Harding"; named for peony enthusiast and gardening author Alice Harding (wife of lawyer Edward Harding); beautiful flower of perfect form and delicate lacy quality; golden yellow stamens visible through many densely-packed white petals; good dark green foliage; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony  Mrs. Euclid Snow Mrs Euclid Snow
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Brand, 1939; double, blush pink, late midseason, approx. 24 - 34" (60 - 85 cm) tall, floriferous, excellent fragrance
Medium height plant bearing many blossoms; large cupped flowers of pale pink with rays of deeper pink spreading through the flower; petals are incurved and slightly waxy; lasts well in a vase
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelet Mrs Franklin D. Roosevelt
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Franklin, 1932; double, pink, late midseason, approx. 28 - 34" (70 - 85 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Also known as "Mrs FDR"; Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1948. Large, exceptionally pretty, rose-form flowers of a soft shell pink, with incurving petals; delightful fragrance; excellent cut flower; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Buck Canyon Gardens)
Photo of peony  Myrtle Gentry Myrtle Gentry
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Brand, 1925; double, pink, late, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, very fragrant
Large, full, rose-form blossoms; pastel salmon-pink colour, which gradually fades to almost a pure white; one of the most fragrant peonies — has the fragrance of a tea rose; blossoms are held well above the foliage; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Nice Gal Nice Gal
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by William Krekler, 1965; semi-double, pink, late midseason, approx. 22 - 32" (55 - 80 cm) tall, fragrant
Large, deep rose-pink blossoms, which fade to a silvery pink; when fully open central tuft of golden stamens and deep rose stigmas is visible; flowers are placed near the foliage; great landscape variety; sturdy bush — no staking needed; produces so many flowers that foliage is almost hidden
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery)
Photo of peony Nick  Shaylor Nick Shaylor
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Allison, 1931; double, blush/white, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Two time winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal: 1941 & 1972; very large, rose-form blossom; before opening, buds show carmine-red streaks; newly-opened blooms are a soft pink which quickly fades to white; may show red flecks or streaks on some petals; vigorous and very reliable bloomer; best when staked; good foliage; exceptional cut flower; outstandingly beautiful peony
(Photo courtesy of Hollingworth Peony Nursery)
Photo of peony Nippon Beauty Nippon Beauty
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1927; Japanese form, red, late, approx 32" (80 cm) tall
Deep garnet-red blooms have petaloid tips flushed and edged in gold; outstanding in flower arrangements; both striking and inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Nymphe Nymphe
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert, 1913; Japanese form, pink, late midseason, approx. 26 - 36" (65 - 90 cm) tall, very fragrant
Masses of deep pink, bowl-shaped blossoms, with small, tight ball of golden yellow stamens in the centre; delicious fragrance; stiff stems, and deep green leaves
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Paul M. Wild Paul M. Wild
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Gilbert H. Wild & Son, 1964; double, red, late midseason, approx. 32 - 38" (80 - 95 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Large, velvety ruby red flowers; side buds open quickly, so that each stem becomes a small bouquet by itself; resists fading; one of the finest double red peonies currently available; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Paula Fay Paula Fay
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Fay, 1968; semi-double, early, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, no fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1988; has numerous, intense shocking pink (almost watermelon colour) flowers, each with a centre of golden stamens; flowers are close to dark green foliage; extremely strong stems — no staking needed; good cut flower; excellent garden flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Pillow Talk Pillow Talk
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Carl G. Klehm, 1973; double, pink, midseason, approx. 26 - 38" (65 - 95 cm) tall, slightly floriferous, good fragrance
Winner of the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1994; very large, rose-shaped, soft, light pink flowers; strong grower; glossy, rich foliage; best when staked
(Photo courtesy of Homestead Farms Nursery)
Photo of peony Pink Hawaiian Coral Pink Hawaiian Coral
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Roy Klehm, 1981; semi-double, pink, early midseason, approx. 34 - 38" (85 - 95 cm) tall, fragrant
Winner of the gold medal from the American Peony Society in 2000; rose-form blossom; notched petals, a wonderful rose-coral colour with with yellow stamens peeking through the centre; over time, the colour gradually fades to a very light coral, almost cream; good foliage and excellent stem strength — no staking required; excellent garden flower or cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Primevere Primevère
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemoine 1907; Japanese anemone form, white & yellow, midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
A flattish flower with creamy white, cupped guard petals around a centre of sulfur yellow petalodes, which turn to milk white with age; profuse bloomer and good grower; sweetly scented; lax stems — staking is needed; good, dark green, but rather coarse foliage; good cut flower; an old favourite
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony  Princess Margaret Princess Margaret
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Murawska, 1960; double, pink, midseason, approx. 34" (85 cm) tall, good fragrance
Named with the permission of Her Royal Highness, Princess Margaret, and of Her Majesty, the Queen Mother, Queen Elizabeth; enormous, beautifully-formed, deep rich rose-pink flower; good foliage, and strong stems, but best when staked; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Peonies Plus)
Photo of peony Raspberry Sundae Raspberry Sundae
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Carl G. Klehm, 1968; double bomb form, white & pink, late midseason, approx. 30 - 36" (75 - 90 cm) tall, excellent fragrance
Large pale pink guard petals surrounding a collar of buttery yellow petals topped with a mass of curly pink petals; looks like a scoop of vanilla ice cream with raspberry topping dripping through the petals; heady, sweet fragrance; vigorous grower; needs some support; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony Red Charm Red Charm
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Glasscock, 1944; double bomb form, red, early, approx. 32" (80 cm) tall, faint fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1956; huge, perfectly formed ball of deep crimson with a multitude of waxy petals; this is the standard against which all other red hybrid peonies are judged; tall, strong stems; excellent foliage
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Red Red Rose Red Red Rose
Herbaceous hybrid introduced Saunders, 1942; semi-double, red, midseason, approx. 32 - 38" (80 - 95 cm) tall, light fragrance
Large, vivid, blood-red, cup-shaped flower with centre of golden stamens; ruffled petals; very attractive in bud; strong, straight stems — no staking needed
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Roselette Roselette
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Saunders, 1950; single, pink, very early, approx. 22 - 36" (55 - 90 cm) tall; floriferous, fragrant
Large, clear, warm rose-pink, cup-formed blooms surrounding a yellow centre; one of the earliest flowering full-sized peonies; large, light green foliage is durable all season; erect stems — no staking needed; great garden plant
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Roy Pehrson's Best Yellow Roy Pehrson's Best Yellow
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Pehrson & Laning, 1982; single, yellow, early, approx. 30 - 34" (75 - 85 cm) tall, occasionally floriferous
Abundant soft yellow flowers; well-rounded broad petals, lightly fluted and cupped; while not a bright yellow like the new Itoh Hybrid intersectionals, it is significantly less expensive; beautiful dark green foliage throughout the season; strong stems — no staking needed
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Ruth Clay Ruth Clay
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Kelsey, 1935; double, red, early midseason, approx. 24 - 32" (60 - 80 cm) tall
An outstanding shade of rich magenta red; buds shaped like rosebuds; strong stems; an excellent cut flower or garden flower
(Photo courtesy of Parkland Perennials)
Photo of peony Sarah Bernhardt Sarah Bernhardt
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemoine, 1906; double, pink, late, aprox. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, pleasant fragrance
Named for the famous Victorian actress; huge blossoms with apple-blossom pink petals, that are silver-tipped, and often have carmine red flecks; reliable and easy to grow; tall bush, which needs staking; handsome deep green foliage; great cut flower; inexpensive; a classic for over a hundred years, and deservedly so
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Scarlett O'Hara Scarlett O'Hara
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Lyman Glasscock & Elizabeth Falk, 1956; single, red, early midseason, approx. 36 - 42" (90 - 105 cm) tall, slight fragrance
Very tall, robust plant; large, vibrant scarlet red petals with contrasting centre of golden stamens; petals fade to cerise pink in sunlight; rich deep green foliage; vigorous, easy to grow
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Sea Shell Sea Shell
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Sass, 1937; single, pink, midseason, approx. 35 - 37" ( 90 - 95 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Also spelled "Seashell"; this peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1990; one of the most admired single pink peonies; numerous large, bright, satiny pink blossoms with a centre of yellow stamens; upright, vigorous bush with strong stems; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Sequestered Sunshine Sequestered Sunshine
Intersectional/Itoh hybrid, introduced by Roger Anderson, 1999; single/semi-double, yellow, late, 26 - 36" (65 - 90 cm) tall, spicy fragrance
Huge, long-lasting blossoms up to 7" (18 cm) in diameter; rich, bright yellow petals with a centre of with red & yellow; long stems; dark decorative foliage; good cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Shirley Temple Shirley Temple
Cross between "Festiva Maxima" and "Mme. Edouard Doriat", double, blush/white, early midseason, approx. 34" (85 cm) tall, light fragrance
Very large flowers - up to 8" (20 cm) in diameter; pink buds open to light rose-pink petals which fade to translucent, creamy white; petals are arranged in whorls - very delicate appearance; good stem strength; lovely garden and cut flowers; usually quite inexpensive
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Show Girl Show Girl
Herbaceous hybrid introduced by Don Hollingsworth, 1984; Japanese anemone form, pink and yellow, early midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, good fragrance
Gorgeous huge flower; striking combination of bright, warm pink guard petals surrounding a centre of creamy yellow petaloids; as the plant matures the Japanese form goes to a full anemone and even to double; dark green foliage growing well down
(Photo courtesy of Hollingsworth Peony Nursery )
Photo of peony Solange Solange
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Lemoine 1907; double, white & pink, late, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
Large creamy white blossoms, suffused with buff and pale salmon pink; open slowly, not fully developed for several days; vigorous, old-fashioned variety, good for cut flowers
(Photo courtesy of Buck Canyon Gardens)
Photo of peony Sorbet Sorbet
P. lactiflora cultivar, discovered by L. Klinkhamer in South Korea, 1987; double bomb form, pink & white, approx. 24 - 36" (60 - 90 cm) tall, nice fragrance
Has large full double blooms consisting of alternating layers of pastel pink and white petals; gorgeous in bouquets; carefree, long-lived plant rarely requires division
(Photo courtesy of Les Jardins Osiris )
Photo of peony Sword Dance Sword Dance
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Auten, 1933; Japanese form, red, late, approx. 34 - 36" (85 - 90 cm) tallnic
Brilliant, large showy flower: bright magenta-red petals surrounding a centre of yellow staminoides streaked with red — very impressive; resists fading; tall, sturdy bush, wind resistant
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Therese Thérèse
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert & Méchin, 1904; double, pink, midseason, medium height, floriferous, faint fragrance
Huge, long petals of pale, old-rose pink, paling toward the base, with a golden yellow centre; fades in strong sunlight; may need staking, since flowers are very heavy; strong stems and heavy foliage
(Photo courtesy of Parkland Perennials)
Photo of peony Top Brass Top Brass
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Klehm, 1968; double bomb form, white, pink & yellow, late midseason, approx. 28 - 34" (70 - 85 cm) tall, fragrant
Creamy white guard petals; subtle tones of ivory, pale yellow, and light pink form the central "bomb"; lovely honey scent; excellent cut flower
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony Tourangelle Tourangelle
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Dessert & Méchin 1910; double, pink, late midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, great fragrance
A beautiful, compact flower; pale cream-white at the base grading to apple-blossom pink in the centre; requires time to develop to its best form; needs support in the garden. Intoxicating fragrance!
(Photo courtesy of peonygarden.com)
Photo of peony  Walter Faxon Walter Faxon
P. lactiflora cultivar, intrduced by Richardson, 1904; double, pink, midseason, approx. 28 - 32" (70 - 80 cm) tall, floriferous, mild fragrance
Striking, intense and very full shell-pink flowers, but may fade in hot sunshine; good stems and foliage; inexpensive, and deservedly popular for over a hundred years
(Photo courtesy of Hidden Springs Flower Farm)
Photo of peony Walter Mains Walter Mains
Herbaceous hybrid, introduced by Walter Mains, 1957; Japanese form, red, early midseason, approx. 32 - 34" (80 - 85 cm) tall; good fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1974; burgundy-red outer petals surround a striking center of mixed red, gold, and white; large, very showy, with strong stems, and has a delightful fragrance
(Photo courtesy of Adelman Peony Gardens)
Photo of peony Westerner Westerner
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Bigger, 1942; Japanese form, pink and yellow, late midseason, approx. 36" (90 cm) tall, floriferous, faint fragrance
This peony won the American Peony Society Gold Medal in 1982; the flowers are quite large; the outer, guard petals are a beautiful shade of orchid pink while the centre is a buttery yellow; stems are sturdy, but may require staking in some locations; nice broad, spreading bush
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)
Photo of peony White Sands White Sands
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Gilbert H. Wild & Son, 1968; Japanese anemone form, white with yellow centre, midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, floriferous, extremely fragrant
Flowers have lots of petals; the centres are usualy yellow, but may also be white; stands upright, so doesn't need staking; has a delightful fragrance
(Photo courtesy of Reilly's Country Gardens ; copyright Phil Reilly)
Photo of peony White Wings White Wings
P. lactiflora cultivar, introduced by Hoogendoorn, 1949; single, white, late midseason, approx. 32 - 36" (80 - 90 cm) tall, slightly fragrant
Has very large flowers, up to 12" (30 cm) in diameter; buds open with purple streaks on the outside that quickly fade to pure white; nice centre of deep yellow stamens; leaves are a dark, glossy green; has nice, sturdy stems
(Photo courtesy of Elysium Garden Nursery)


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Last revised September 12, 2008